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App created to help partially sighted and blind people navigate the Queen's Walkway

App created to help partially sighted and blind people navigate the Queen's Walkway

Nicola Hine

App created to help partially sighted and blind people navigate the Queen's Walkway

A retired teacher who specialises in helping blind and partially sighted people tested the route of the Queen’s Walkway in Windsor on Tuesday.


Roger Wilson-Hinds set up the charity Screenreader in 2004 to help visually impaired computer users.

As technology has moved on it now creates apps for smartphones based around their experiences and needs.

With his help, The Outdoor Trust, which is creating the walkway, hopes to make the 6.32km route more accessible for those who have partial or no sight.

The walkway will be accompanied by an app with details of points of interest.

Roger, who is partially sighted, spent Monday walking with Jim and Jake Walker from the trust to collect information which can be added to it to help visually impaired users familiarise themselves with their surroundings.

When complete, it is hoped it will inform them of information such as potential obstacles on the route, like kerbs and roadworks, or where the nearest bus stop or station is.

Speaking about Screenreader, the 75-year-old said: “The vision is to make the world a safer and more welcoming place for blind people.”

Of the walkway, he added: “It’s a lovely project to be involved with.”

The Queen’s Walkway has been designed to mark the Queen becoming the longest reigning British monarch in September.

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